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Using Atom editor

For the past year or so, I've been using a variety of code editors, from Notepad++ to Sublime Text, Brackets, and more lately, Atom. For some reason, I like Atom. I thought I'd let you know two very useful things concerning it.

The Best Atom Packages

There's a Github page of great packages for Atom. These packages include various linters, and Sublime Text like features such as the Minimap, plus colour pickers and syntax highlighters. It's a good page to bookmark.

Atom EditorConfig file

EditorConfig is an attempt to standardize the configuration of code editors. There is one for Atom here.

Installing Atom packages behind a proxy?

This was a bit of a headscratcher, but was eventually fixed. My documentation resource had a mistake in the commands you issue to work around this.

You basically have to configure the Atom Package Manager (APM) with the following:
  • apm config http-proxy
  • apm config https-proxy
  • apm config strict-ssl false

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